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Teacher Leader Stories: Britni Haynie & Kanan Patel

Teacher Leaders Britni Haynie and Kanan Patel

Wildflower Teacher Leaders Britni Haynie and Kanan Patel share a passion for reflecting Wildflower’s foundational commitments to practice anti-bias anti-racism and unity in their schools and their work with emerging Teacher Leaders around the country.

Britni Haynie is a Teacher Leader at Tiger Lily Montessori, an infant and toddler program in Providence, Rhode Island. After working at a series of Montessori and non-Montessori child care centers across several states, she landed at Tiger Lily during a leadership transition that left her rebuilding relationships with families. Despite those challenges, she described the experiences as life-changing:

I have learned so much and grown so much as a mother, as a teacher, as a human, in general, through teal practices, Holacracy, being able to show up as my full self, building an environment where we respect our community members, and we put the children first.

Kanan Patel remembers wanting to be a teacher from her earliest years. She studied education and attained her Montessori degree in India before moving to the US with her husband and growing family. After hearing about the original Wildflower Montessori School in 2014, Kanan reached out to the network to learn more about the model. Soon after, she enrolled her daughter at the second Wildflower school in the network–Aster Montessori School, a Cambridge primary program–and began to work there.

Those early days were tough because The Wildflower Foundation didn’t exist yet–Kanan explained that they were building the bike as they were riding it.She described the community the early Teacher Leaders built in Cambridge:

We all understood that this is not work that is done in one day; it is ongoing work that will force us to grow and evolve and will continue as long as we live…but there’s a community around me to help me, support me, and guide me, and that really was the basis for The Wildflower Foundation. Now, so many amazing people work at the Foundation who support the work that Teacher Leaders do. It absolutely takes a village to build even a microschool.

Kanan and Britni both leveraged their experience and passion for Wildflower as Operations Guides—A partner to emerging Teacher Leaders as they navigate the operational and administrative aspects of the School Startup Journey (e.g., budgeting, facilities, enrollment). Britni explained that the role mirrors a guide in the classroom: “I am here for you, for resources. I create an environment for you to feel safe to explore. I guide you through the SSJ, but you’re the one who’s in charge, and I follow you.”  

To join the next Teacher Leader stories event on May 25, register here.

DC Wildflower Public Charter School Secures Full Approval!

Congratulations to Riverseed School Approval

On April 18, the DC Public Charter School Board voted unanimously to fully approve the 15-year charter agreement of the DC Wildflower Public Charter School (DCWPCS). This full charter approval vote will enable the Founding DC Wildflower Board and Staff to transition from planning to implementation as they prepare to open their first site, The Riverseed School.

DCWPCS Executive Director Rachel Kimboko, Founding Teacher Leaders Ebony Marshman and Zani Dalili-Ortique and Board Chair Neil Campbell thanked the Public Charter School Board for their feedback throughout their application and approval process. Both Zani and Ebony are Ward 7 residents, and Zani expressed her excitement to continue their journey: 

As a Ward 7 resident, a career Montessori educator, and a parent of school-aged children, I am thrilled to continue my work in bringing joy, laughter, and learning to children and families–this time in my own community–using an approach that has been proven to build critical thinking, independence, a joy of learning and collaborative work skills. 

The Riverseed School is prepared to open this fall in the Burrville neighborhood of Ward 7 in a beautiful converted residential home located on a large triple lot, including ample outdoor space for safe play and nature-based Montessori learning. 

Over the past year, the team spent extensive time building community support and partnerships: They attended and held community meetings and playdates, volunteered, met their neighbors and created a network of supportive service providers for students. They also hired a student support partner and operations partner to complement the founding team in the first year of operation and as the charter grows. 

The Riverseed School will be the first of up to six microschools, providing 225 students the opportunity for a free public Montessori education in beautiful, neighborhood-embedded, intimate learning environments.

Teacher Leader Stories: Karla Vázquez-Torres and Ruth Melián

Ruth Melián and Kárla Vazques Torres Profile Images

More than 80 people gathered together to hear the stories of two Wildflower Teacher Leaders from Puerto Rico, the visions that sparked their schools, and their experiences with Wildflower’s School Startup Journey. They included parents, interested Montessorians from around the world, and educators with dreams of creating education environments for their communities.

Karla Vázquez-Torres is a Founding Teacher Leader at Mariposa Montessori, which bloomed out of a partnership with a home for women who have experienced domestic violence. She spoke with participants about her previous work in traditional schools, sharing that it often felt like a hostile environment for children and educators alike.

Karla realized that she needed to join with other brave people fighting for Montessori for the communities that need it most. On that path, she met the Wildflower family and her partner in founding Mariposa to serve the protected children within the home and–more recently–the children from a neighboring foster home. 

Karla describes the changes she sees in her students as almost instantaneous: 

It is amazing. The kids come with a lot of trauma, and they find in Mariposa a peaceful space with love and respect. That’s their space that we create. At first, they don’t know how to deal with freedom–they ask for permission, ‘Can I go to the bathroom? Can I do this?’ In a couple of days, they are born again.

Ruth Melian founded Moriviví Montessori before discovering Wildflower. Morivivi also partners with a foster home in Caguas, Puerto Rico. She told the group that she “fell in love” with Wildflower after attending the Montessori for Social Justice conference in 2019. She met many Wildflowers there and found a group of like-minded people who believed in centering Montessori on its founding vision of equity and social justice. They decided then and there to join the Wildflower network, seeing their alignment with Wildflower’s principles and values

Ruth feels incredibly proud of the Moriviví community, including the parents who believed in the school and organized a fundraising campaign. Because the school started as a toddler and primary program, the parents wanted an elementary program so their children and the foster home children could continue in a Wildflower school. A year later, Passiflora Montessori opened next door. She grounded this experience in what makes a Wildflower school different: “It’s not only the Teacher Leaders doing the job, it’s the whole community embracing and taking care of all of us.”

Both Karla and Ruth spoke about their experience as Teacher Leaders within the Wildflower network as “Montessori for adults,” echoing the freedom with support paradigm that the children experience in a Montessori learning environment. In describing the process of starting up her school, Karla explained: “Wildflower is a family full of dreamers, fighters, a community of people who walk with you on an amazing journey. You always have them. Today I can’t imagine teaching in a school that is not with Wildflower.”

Interested in learning more about starting a Wildflower school? Join our next Teacher Leader story on XYZ and, if you can’t make it, fill out the Contact Us form to learn more!

Pollinating Innovation: Removing barriers to BIPOC leadership in Montessori education

Wildflower seeds are everywhere, including in the hearts and minds of educators all across the country. Much like the relationship between bees and the flowers they pollinate, Wildflower schools spread through the leadership of entrepreneurial educators as they shape the blooms of new teacher-led schools in their communities. 

 

Unfortunately, the current Montessori teacher landscape does not reflect the racial or socioeconomic diversity of the United States. Just as Black, Indigenous, and People of Color families haven’t historically had the same access to Montessori as more affluent white families, the same goes for educators. That is why we are launching the Wildflower Pollinator Fund–an initiative to diversify the Montessori educator workforce and support Black, Indigenous, People of Color educators to become credentialed Montessori educators. We plan to raise $1 million over the next three years to train and support 100 new BIPOC Montessorians, creating the capacity for their leadership to grow and diversify the beauty of the broader Montessori ecosystem.

 

This work is critically important to me because–after 16 years of leadership in public education–I have the unique opportunity to steward the growth of DC Wildflower Public Charter School and toddler programs here in the District of Columbia. When I think about the challenges and opportunities in front of me, I believe my most important work is to dismantle the domination culture educators have operated in and allow them to reset from the ups and downs they’ve weathered working in education.

 

I’ve already experienced this with our founding Teacher Leaders, Zani Dalili-Ortique and Ebony Marshman. Creating an environment that cultivates their ownership and autonomy is a massive task in a world where anti-Blackness has constructed assumptions about the capabilities of Black leaders and educators. Through our work together, building trust, and honoring their pace, I’ve seen firsthand the deep relationships with families and community that ground their vision and plans for The Riverseed School. 

 

There are many more incredible BIPOC educators like Zani and Ebony out there—people committed to their work with children, who have stewarded learning pods during COVID, who are credentialed educators but not Montessori trained. I have seen how strongly their beliefs align with Montessori philosophy and Wildflower’s liberatory purpose. Trends throughout the Wildflower network reinforce my experience: just under 10% of the prospective BIPOC educators who come to us are already Montessori trained. We want to support them in becoming Montessori educators in a way that is accessible for their place in life.

 

Montessori training is typically expensive and logistically difficult to access, with tuition averaging between $13,000 to $15,000 and hefty in-person training requirements that make it difficult for educators who need to maintain full-time employment. Even when candidates receive scholarships to local programs, many report that they are one of the few BIPOC students and that their program lacked an equity lens.

 

Regardless of cost, we believe investing in BIPOC leadership is the right thing to do, but these barriers continue to be a significant impediment to educators. We now have a considerable opportunity to pilot an effort to expand and accelerate our work through partnership with Rising Tide Montessori, a game-changing new AMI training program taking Montessori training online through a self-paced, low-residency program. 

 

Rising Tide’s program reduces the cost of training by half while allowing Wildflower the opportunity to create a supportive cohort of educators from across the country as they go through their online training and develop their school vision. Rising Tide will ensure our newest Montessori educators are equipped with the baseline practice and pedagogy to succeed as Montessori educators. Wildflower can provide further support and growth opportunities to determine what kind of school environment they want to thrive in as educators and liberatory leaders. 

EVENT: Next Teacher Leader Stories Conversation on February 24th

For those who are eager to learn more about the lived experience of Wildflower Teacher Leaders in designing and operating liberatory microschools with their communities, we invite you to join the next Teacher Leader Stories conversation. Perhaps you are considering leading a Wildflower School as the next step in your journey? If so, these conversations are a great opportunity to learn more about different ways Wildflower schools come to life in communities across the country.   

 

Join us for an evening of storytelling, reflection and learning with Wildflower Teacher Leaders, Renee Jolley + Lindsey Barnes. Please extend this invitation to other educators in your network that may have an interest in opening a micro-school with their community!

 

And if you can’t join us but want to stay in touch, let us know by filling out this quick form!

 

Thursday, February 24th

6:30 PM EST

*Virtual Event*

Registration: 

https://bit.ly/TLStoriesFeb2022 

EVENT: Next Teacher Leader Stories Conversation on January 20th!

As we begin 2022, we know educators are working harder than ever to serve children and families. For those who are eager to learn more about the lived experience of Wildflower Teacher Leaders in designing and operating liberatory microschools with their communities, we invite you to join the next Teacher Leader Stories conversation. Perhaps you are considering leading a Wildflower School as the next step in your journey? If so, these conversations are a great opportunity to learn more about different ways Wildflower schools come to life in communities across the country.   

 

On January 20th, join us for an evening of storytelling and learning with Wildflower Teacher Leaders, Angelina Hawley-Dolan and Mario Benabe. 

 

Thursday, January 20th

6:30 PM EST

*Virtual Event*

Registration: https://bit.ly/TLstories2022

 

We look forward to seeing you there!

 

–Maia Blankenship & Rebecca H. Snyder

Coming Home: Schools’ affordable housing and community partnerships are helping fulfill Wildflower’s purpose

The Virginia Coffee House, permanent housing for former residents of Lydia’s House and named after Cincinnati Civil Rights activist Virginia Coffey, sits above Azalea Montessori.

How do you bring an affordable Montessori education to communities that historically haven’t had access to it? 

 

It’s a question at the heart of Wildflower, and one that innovative Teacher Leaders grapple with regularly. Through the years, Wildflower schools have addressed the tension by embracing strategies such as city and state-subsidized tuition vouchers, creating tuition-free public charter schools, and pursuing school district partnerships. But recently, various teachers across the network have unlocked a piece of the puzzle that they hope will pave the way for an even greater number of students to access a Wildflower education. They are co-locating their schools in the epicenters of the communities that need them most: affordable housing complexes, shelters for women and children, and transitional housing. 

 

Creating deep and lasting partnerships with existing organizations in a community isn’t new for Wildflower. As Teacher Leaders have sourced buildings for their microschools in the past, they have followed a common Montessori practice of co-locating with houses of worship, as is the case for Marigold and Allium, both of which are located inside churches in Massachusetts.

 

The new co-location partnerships Teacher Leaders have forged with various providers of affordable housing are the sort of exciting and mutually beneficial relationships that will help the network make Wildflower schools more accessible to all families. In each partnership, the Wildflower school rents space from a housing nonprofit at a below-market rate, and enrollment is prioritized for children who live there. Taking advantage of the subsidized rent allows higher salaries for the teachers and, in schools with tuition, more affordable fees for enrolled families.

“It’s really meaningful to everyone involved; we’re forming partnerships with organizations who know and have been serving their communities for many years,” said Ali Scholes, a Wildflower Foundation partner spearheading efforts to grow more co-location partnerships. “Part of why families are so excited to send their children to co-located schools is because of the schools’ explicit commitment to centering families who have been historically marginalized.”

Jeana Olszewski, founding Teacher Leader at Azalea in Norwood, Ohio, said co-locating with apartments for former residents of the women’s and children’s shelter Lydia’s House has created a warm community. Jeana tells the story of two single mothers who likely would not have met if not for Azalea, but whose bonds have grown outside the classroom. One woman is a former resident of Lydia’s house, and the other lives in a neighboring community, and was drawn to Azalea. From playdates to sleepovers to helping navigate each other’s work schedules, they have both grown to appreciate the sense of family the small school provides.

“Our school community feels like a really organic and genuine expression of the Wildflower principles. Our students love each other and they’re so close; it’s like having 25 cousins 

together,” Jeana said. “We’re physically located in this urban neighborhood, there’s always a bit of a ruckus outside, but we also have a children’s garden across the street with chickens and a bunny. When we’re walking down the street to the several nearby parks, people who live in the neighborhood are looking for us. They’re always waving.”

 

Norwood, a city outside Cincinnati, is full of Montessori schools of all types: private, public, faith-based. But Jeana, a longtime local educator and a veteran Montessori teacher and parent, said that before Azalea opened its doors, Montessori schools may have been plentiful, but a Montessori education was anything but accessible. 

 

“We have all this Montessori in the city, but it’s often the wealthy, privileged kids who get it,” she said. “Even the public Montessori schools are mostly located in the nicer neighborhoods.”

Karla Vasquez-Torres, a Teacher Leader at Mariposa in northern Puerto Rico, agrees. Her school is located inside a shelter for women and children called Hogar Ruth. The exact location is not public in order to protect the safety of their students, who all either live at the shelter or have parents who work there. A Wildflower veteran, Karla previously ran Flamboyan, a Montessori school in partnership with the local public school district. 

“In Puerto Rico, Montessori is an elite privilege. But the moment I became certified, I knew I wanted to help bring Montessori education to kids who otherwise wouldn’t be able to afford it. When I saw and lived the results of what Wildflower can be, I knew I had to open this up to more kids.”

 

Because the majority of the students at Mariposa have experienced violence in their home, Karla said they come to school with little agency and are often scared to jump in and participate in lessons.

 

“These kids come in without a voice…but here, they find a place where they can talk and someone will listen to and respect them. They learn that violence is not the solution,” she said. “When you start seeing those kids being owners of their space, it’s just beautiful. They find a place where they can be themselves and be free.”

 

***

 

While the Teacher Leaders say there is no question that a Wildflower education is particularly meaningful and effective for the students they serve, there are plenty of operational benefits to partnering with these housing organizations, many of which are longtime nonprofits and highly respected in their communities. 

 

When the pandemic hit in Spring 2020, leaders of the nonprofit Lydia’s House, which runs the transitional housing where Azalea is located, came to Jeana and offered to waive their rent for six months while they figured out how to operate school during an uncertain time.  

 

“Partnering with a nonprofit like that, they will have your back,” Jeana said. 

 

Karla from Mariposa said that Hogar Ruth, the 30-year-old women’s shelter where their school is located, has been instrumental in helping them identify and access grant funding they might not have otherwise known about. 

 

Claire Ricker, Director of Real Estate at Coalition for a Better Acre (CBA), said their partnership with Wildflower has been a critical piece of their efforts to transform the Haverhill neighborhood.

 

“If you’re trying to improve lives, you have to think about changing many elements of a single neighborhood, in a systematic way, at a steady pace. With this in mind we felt that a partnership with Wildflower Schools was crucial to meeting our goals of not only providing safe, stable affordable housing, but also to use our physical space to further invigorate the neighborhood.”

 

***

 

Teacher Leader Janet Begin has been laying the groundwork for these co-location partnerships for years. Her own school, Marigold, is co-located within a Haverhill, Massachusetts church, but Janet, who believes strongly in using Montessori for social justice, knew there was even more potential. A lightbulb first went on three years ago after meeting with the housing nonprofit CBA and realizing their mission and Wildflower’s were closely aligned. Later, a parent at Marigold, Nicole Randall, expressed interest in Montessori education, and Janet tucked it away. Finally, the stars aligned this year after Nicole, now a Montessori-trained teacher with several years as an educator under her belt, agreed to start Snowdrop, a toddler program located in the same complex as some of CBA’s affordable housing. At least 25 percent of the available seats at Snowdrop will be reserved for residents of the housing complex, and many will receive state education vouchers to help pay a portion of their tuition. 

 

“Being a teacher, you plant these seeds because it’s just what you do, and then years later you start to see it all pay off,” Janet said. “There’s just a lot of people pushing for this and we’re all really excited to be here.”

With Snowdrop’s opening, Wildflower leaders like Ali are hoping that the model becomes a pilot for future collaborations. Currently, the Wildflower Foundation is in the process of making connections with other affordable housing nonprofits to support new Teacher Leaders who want to pursue similar opportunities. 

 

While the natural diversity that results from these co-location partnerships is undoubtedly positive for the students, Nicole Randall, the Teacher Leader who will run Snowdrop starting in September, said she is also grateful for the opportunity it will give her.

 

“I’m excited for myself, to learn and to grow,” she said. “ I’m really excited about the exchange of ideas.” 

CO-LOCATED WILDFLOWER SCHOOLS

Azalea

Location: Norwood, Ohio

Co-location: Permanent housing for former guests of Lydia’s House, a shelter for women and children 

Opened in: September 2019

 

Snowdrop

Location: Haverhill, Massachusetts 

Co-location: Coalition for a Better Acre, a nonprofit that provides affordable housing 

Opened in: Anticipated opening September 2021

 

Marigold

Location: Haverhill, Massachusetts

Partnership: Trinity Episcopal Church 

Opened in: 2015

Miramelinda

Location: Cambridge, Massachusetts 

Partnership: Just-a-Start, an affordable housing nonprofit

Opened in: Fall 2018

 

Sundrops 

Location: San Jose, California 

Partnership:  El Rancho Verde, an affordable housing community located in northeast San Jose

Opened in: February 2021

 

Mariposa

Location: Puerto Rico

Partnership: Hogar Ruth, a shelter for women and children 

Opened in: January 2021

Students at Azalea wear rain suits while participating in the school’s outdoor program, “Azalea Outdoors.”

Wildflower Charter School Sprouts in DC

Teacher Leaders Ebony Marshman and Zani Dalili-Ortique enjoy a Family Day at Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens

The seeds of a series of Wildflower microschools have been planted in Washington, DC. Through conditional approval in April 2021 – DC Wildflower PCS, only one of five applications the DC Public Charter School Board approved – the first microschool will open in Fall 2022 as The Riverseed School in Ward 7 or 8.

In this Q&A, Regional Site Entrepreneur Maia Blankenship previews the arrival of Wildflower in the District of Columbia. She shares what families can expect from these teacher-led, micro, Montessori schools and how educators can join the effort to establish liberatory learning environments in and around our nation’s capital.

We also invite you to tune into the following conversation with the DC Wildflower Public Charter School Leadership Team on the Montessori in Action Podcast!

How would you describe what Wildflower will add to the DC public school landscape? 

Imagine small, tuition-free public schools – about 25 students – throughout the District of Columbia, tucked into neighborhoods and led by dynamic teachers dedicated to creating a liberatory learning environment in partnership with the community. DC Wildflower Public Charter School will create spaces for educators and communities to design classroom sites where each child’s identity is affirmed and their genius is unleashed. We believe that intentionally small, Montessori learning environments enable the liberation of children, families and educators from the structures that limit opportunity. Together we can and must accelerate the journey to a more racially just and equitable world.

hiking adults and children

How will Wildflower schools build and support community in DC?

Every school site will foster deep relationships with the community in which it is embedded. Teacher Leaders will build relationships that go beyond the students and families they serve by partnering with and tapping the unique assets of their community. Families and students will thrive in a vibrant school community that reflects who they are, the assets they bring, as well as the deep investment of educators, volunteers, local businesses, and nonprofits.

We believe that communities of color, especially, know what they need to thrive – it is often resources and access that are in short supply. The community’s ideas and needs should be central in the design of schools. Educators, families and children, advocates and invested community partners will collaborate to create Wildflower classroom sites that reflect the genius, beauty, cultural wealth and assets of the neighborhood.

In a city with a lot of school choices already, what differentiates Wildflower?

Each Wildflower school is intentionally small and directly reflects the community. We provide liberatory learning environments that are anti-bias, anti-racist, inclusive, identify-affirming and healing. Our schools are co-founded by educators who serve as guides (Montessori’s term for teachers) and also serve as the school leaders, managing the day-to-day operations and administration of the school.

Tell us about the leaders of DC Wildflower Public Charter School and their mission.

Our two founding Teacher Leaders, Zanso (Zani) Dalili-Ortique and Ebony Marshman, are creating a community-embedded liberatory learning environment east of the Anacostia River – a school centered on Black students in a center of DC’s Black community. As local Black Montessorians, Ebony and Zani have deep experience as educators in DC, which, despite its increasing diversity and strength, remains stifled by historic and present-day racism as well as discriminatory policies and practices.

Also, we are thrilled that Rachel Kimboko joined DCWPCS as our Founding Executive Director of Stakeholder Engagement. A longtime contributor to DC’s Montessori community, Rachel will partner with Zani, Ebony and the Board of Trustees to keep us on track to open the Riverseed School, the first of up to six sites within the charter.

How is educational equity woven into Wildflower DC’s mission?

Our approach is grounded in the fact that the Montessori method is a holistic, time-tested curriculum that is keenly attuned to a child’s development and that, at its roots, is a tool for liberation. Providing a Montessori education faithfully and effectively requires both readiness of the environment (a physical space, within the community and saturated with identity-affirming materials and curriculum) and readiness of the people, especially teachers and staff who are committed to liberation and to disrupting all forms of oppression and who are armed with the tools to implement with purpose. Across all sites this includes:

  • Teacher-led and community-activated spaces that center Black people, Indigenous people, Latinx people and all people of color
  • Small and safe settings that are nimble and adapt to community needs
  • Intentionally anti-racist and anti-bias approach  
  • Identity-affirming, inclusive spaces 
  • Freedom to make decisions, move and communicate – with limits 
  • Focus on developing intrinsic motivation instead of extrinsic rewards 
  • Hands-on, experiential, challenging curriculum
maia and daughter on grass

What are opportunities to stay connected and get involved in Wildflower’s DC regional hub?

We invite educators and families committed to liberatory, culturally affirming, community-embedded microschools to design with us. Public charter schools are one way that Wildflowers will grow in the DC region, but there are other ways, too. We are seeking Teacher Leaders interested in founding toddler programs or other teacher-led liberatory programs in the metro area.

Learn more about our work at https://wildflowerschools.org/dc/, and contact us at [email protected] to get involved. On social media, follow Wildflower DC’s development on Instagram @wildflowerschools.dc and on Facebook.

Resilient Roots: Celebrating Wildflower Seedlings

WF Seedlings Banner Image

Every year, a new group of Wildflower schools peeks through the soil for the first time. But what a year this has been. In the best of times, the challenges, uncertainty, and personal growth of designing and launching a new school are immensely demanding. Yet Wildflower Teacher Leaders rose to meet the storm of challenges this year with resiliency, grounded in purpose, experience, and love for the families they serve.

 

For the first time, Wildflower is celebrating the achievements of these education entrepreneurs throughout their opening year with the inaugural edition of Wildflower Seedlings – a special publication highlighting the first year of our newest class of Wildflower schools. Please join Wildflower in welcoming the 14 new schools that opened their doors to families this year and their founding Teacher Leaders who transformed their lifetimes of learning and dreaming into their schools in their own communities.

 

Download Wildflower Seedlings

 

In these pages, you will meet the exceptional Teacher Leaders behind these schools and see what they have to say about what inspires and motivates their work as educators. To read more about their stories, backgrounds, and the beautiful schools they have created, please check out our first edition of Wildflower Seedlings.

Hub Spotlight: Wildflowers Grow in New Jersey

infants smiling working with sensorial materials
Despite a challenging year for childcare centers overall, and certainly new obstacles created by the global pandemic in the creation of new programs, Wildflower’s budding New Jersey hub has continued to plant and tend to its seeds.

 

We started off this year with the exciting news that Dr. Erika McDowell agreed to come on as our new New Jersey state Site Entrepreneur. Before joining Wildflower, Erika served as an Executive Director and Director of PBIS (positive behavior intervention and supports) and Youth Court for The School District of Philadelphia. She has also been an assistant principal and teacher. Her in-depth experience includes restorative practices, equity, positive behavioral supports, conflict resolution, classroom management, bullying prevention, and behavioral data support. She has a Superintendent’s credential, a EdD in from Drexel University in Educational Leadership and Management, and began her career as a drama teacher in Paterson, NJ, which is where she grew up. Erika will now be supporting New Jersey’s new and existing teacher leaders, as well as developing strategy and funding relationships to support Wildflower’s growth across the state.

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